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The Ultimate Guide to the BBC Micro:bit: Download The Official User Guide books pdf 21 for Free



The Official BBC Micro:bit User Guide books pdf 21




Do you want to learn how to create amazing projects with a tiny computer that fits in your pocket? Do you want to discover how software and hardware work together to make things happen in the real world? Do you want to have fun and be creative with coding and electronics? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this article is for you. In this article, you will learn everything you need to know about the BBC Micro:bit, a pocket-sized computer that you can program and use for various purposes. You will also find out how to get the official user guide books in pdf format for free, so you can have them handy whenever you need them.




The Official BBC Micro:bit User Guide books pdf 21


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlcod.com%2F2ud878&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1nzp9Ylqv2EqD8zgRpBKSi



What is the BBC Micro:bit?




The BBC Micro:bit is a small device that measures about 4cm by 5cm and has a lot of features that make it a powerful and versatile computer. It was designed by the BBC and a group of partners, including Microsoft, Samsung, ARM, and others, to inspire young people to learn about computing and digital technology. It was first launched in 2016, when one million devices were given away for free to every year 7 student in the UK. Since then, it has been used by millions of people around the world for education, entertainment, and innovation.


The BBC Micro:bit is not just a toy or a gadget. It is a tool that helps you understand how computers work and how they can interact with the world around them. You can use it to learn how to code, how to create electronic circuits, how to make games, music, robots, sensors, and much more. You can also connect it to other devices, such as your phone, tablet, laptop, or even another micro:bit, using Bluetooth, USB, or radio waves.


What are the features of the BBC Micro:bit?




The BBC Micro:bit has many features that make it a unique and powerful device. Here are some of them:


Features on the front




  • Buttons: There are two buttons on the front of the device that you can use as inputs. You can program them to do different things when you press them, such as changing the display or playing a sound.



  • LED display & light sensor: There are 25 red LEDs on the front of the device that form a 5x5 grid. You can use them as an output to show images, text, numbers, or animations. You can also use them as an input by detecting the amount of light that falls on them.



  • Pins - GPIO: There are 20 pins on the bottom edge of the device that you can use as inputs or outputs. You can connect them to other electronic components, such as LEDs, motors, sensors, or speakers, using crocodile clips or wires. You can also use them to communicate with other devices using protocols such as I2C, SPI, or UART.



  • Pin - 3 volt power: There is a pin on the bottom edge of the device that provides 3 volts of power. You can use it to power other components that need a low voltage, such as LEDs or sensors.



  • Pin - Ground: There is a pin on the bottom edge of the device that provides a common ground for the circuit. You need to connect it to the negative terminal of the battery or the USB cable, and to any other component that needs a ground connection.



  • Touch logo - new: There is a logo on the front of the device that you can use as an input. You can program it to do different things when you touch it, such as changing the display or playing a sound.



  • Microphone LED - new: There is a small LED on the front of the device that indicates when the microphone is active. It lights up when the device is listening to sound.



Features on the back




  • Radio & Bluetooth antenna: There is an antenna on the back of the device that allows it to communicate wirelessly with other devices, such as your phone, tablet, laptop, or another micro:bit. You can use it to send and receive data, messages, or commands using radio waves or Bluetooth.



  • Processor & temperature sensor: There is a processor on the back of the device that controls all the functions and features of the micro:bit. It also has a built-in temperature sensor that you can use to measure the ambient temperature.



  • Compass: There is a compass on the back of the device that you can use to measure the direction of the magnetic north pole. You can use it to create navigation apps, games, or projects that involve orientation.



  • Accelerometer: There is an accelerometer on the back of the device that you can use to measure the acceleration and movement of the micro:bit. You can use it to detect gestures, such as shaking, tilting, or dropping the device, or to create motion-based apps, games, or projects.



  • Pins: There are five pins on the back of the device that are duplicates of some of the pins on the front. You can use them for the same purposes as the front pins, but they are easier to access if you want to solder them to a board or a connector.



  • Micro USB socket: There is a micro USB socket on the back of the device that you can use to connect it to your computer or phone using a USB cable. You can use it to power the device, transfer code, or communicate with other devices.



  • Single yellow LED: There is a single yellow LED on the back of the device that indicates when the device is connected to a power source or a computer via USB. It lights up when there is power and flashes when there is data transfer.



  • Reset button: There is a reset button on the back of the device that you can use to restart the device if it freezes or crashes. You can also use it to enter bootloader mode, which allows you to update the firmware of the device.



  • Battery socket: There is a battery socket on the back of the device that you can use to connect a battery pack with two AAA batteries. You can use it to power the device when you want to use it without a USB cable.



  • USB interface chip: There is a USB interface chip on the back of the device that handles all the communication between the micro:bit and your computer or phone via USB. It also acts as a flash drive that stores your code and allows you to drag and drop files onto it.



How to set up your BBC Micro:bit?




Setting up your BBC Micro:bit is very easy and quick. Here are the steps you need to follow:


  • Get a micro:bit and a battery pack with 2 AAA batteries. You can buy them online or from a local retailer. You can also use a micro:bit that you got from your school or a workshop.



  • Get a computer, phone, or tablet with internet access to load the code editors. You can use any device that has a web browser, such as Chrome, Firefox, Safari, or Edge. You can also use dedicated apps for iOS or Android devices.



  • If you're using a computer, get a USB cable to connect your micro:bit to your computer. You can use any micro USB cable that you have at home or buy one online or from a local retailer.



  • Connect your micro:bit to your device using the USB cable or Bluetooth. If you're using a USB cable, plug one end into the micro USB socket on the back of the micro:bit and the other end into a USB port on your computer. If you're using Bluetooth, follow the instructions on the app or website to pair your micro:bit with your device.



  • Go to the official website of the BBC Micro:bit at https://microbit.org/ and choose the code editor you want to use. You can choose between MakeCode and Python, which are the two most popular and supported languages for the micro:bit. You can also explore other languages and editors that are available for the micro:bit.



  • Start coding your micro:bit using the code editor of your choice. You can follow the tutorials and guides on the website or create your own projects from scratch. You can also find many examples and ideas online from other users and communities.



  • Transfer your code to your micro:bit using the USB cable or Bluetooth. If you're using a USB cable, drag and drop the file that contains your code onto the MICROBIT drive that appears on your computer. If you're using Bluetooth, click on the Download button on the app or website and follow the instructions to send your code wirelessly to your micro:bit.



  • Enjoy your micro:bit and see what it can do. You can disconnect it from your device and use the battery pack to power it independently. You can also connect it to other components and devices to make more complex and interactive projects.



How to code your BBC Micro:bit?




Coding your BBC Micro:bit is fun and easy. You can use different programming languages and editors to create various types of projects with your micro:bit. Here are some of them:


MakeCode




MakeCode is a graphical code editor that lets you create programs using colour-coded blocks that snap together like puzzle pieces. It is ideal for beginners who want to learn the basics of coding and logic without worrying about syntax and errors. It is also powerful enough to access all the features of the micro:bit and create advanced projects.


To use MakeCode, go to https://makecode.microbit.org/ and start a new project. You will see a simulator of the micro:bit on the left side of the screen and a toolbox of blocks on the right side of the screen. You can drag and drop blocks from the toolbox to the workspace in the middle of the screen and connect them together to form your program. You can also switch to JavaScript mode to see the text-based code behind the blocks.


You can test your program on the simulator by clicking on the buttons or shaking the device. You can also transfer your program to your real micro:bit by clicking on the Download button and following the instructions.


Python




Python is a text-based code editor that lets you create programs using words and symbols that form commands and expressions. It is suitable for intermediate and advanced users who want to deepen their programming skills and learn a widely used language in various fields such as data science and machine learning.


To use Python, go to https://python.microbit.org/ and start a new project. You will see a simulator of the micro:bit on the right side of the screen and an editor on the left side of the screen. You can type your code in the editor using the Python syntax and rules. You can also use the buttons on the top of the screen to run, save, load, or share your code.


You can test your code on the simulator by clicking on the buttons or shaking the device. You can also transfer your code to your real micro:bit by clicking on the Download button and following the instructions.


Other languages and editors




Besides MakeCode and Python, there are many other languages and editors that you can use to code your micro:bit. Some of them are:


  • Scratch: A graphical code editor that lets you create programs using colour-coded blocks that snap together like puzzle pieces. It is similar to MakeCode, but it has more features and options for creating animations, games, and stories. You can use Scratch with your micro:bit by connecting it via Bluetooth and using it as a physical controller or sensor. To use Scratch, go to https://scratch.mit.edu/microbit and follow the instructions.



  • Swift Playgrounds: A text-based code editor that lets you create programs using Swift, a modern and powerful language that is used to develop apps for iOS and macOS devices. You can use Swift Playgrounds with your micro:bit by connecting it via Bluetooth and using it as a physical controller or sensor. To use Swift Playgrounds, download the app from the App Store on your iPad or Mac computer, and get the interactive book for the micro:bit from https://microbit.org/get-started/swift-playgrounds/.



  • Rust: A text-based code editor that lets you create programs using Rust, a fast and reliable language that is used to develop systems and applications that run on various platforms. You can use Rust with your micro:bit by connecting it via USB and using it as a standalone device or as part of a larger system. To use Rust, go to https://rust.microbit.org/ and follow the instructions.



  • Ada: A text-based code editor that lets you create programs using Ada, a safe and secure language that is used to develop critical systems and applications that require high reliability and performance. You can use Ada with your micro:bit by connecting it via USB and using it as a standalone device or as part of a larger system. To use Ada, go to https://learn.adacore.com/courses/intro-to-ada/chapters/micro_bit.html and follow the instructions.



How to make projects with your BBC Micro:bit?




Making projects with your BBC Micro:bit is fun and easy. You can use your imagination and creativity to make anything you want with your micro:bit. You can also use other components and devices to make more complex and interactive projects.


Here are some examples of projects you can try with your micro:bit:


Name badge




You can turn your micro:bit into an animated name badge that displays your name or a message on the LED display. You can also change the message by pressing the buttons or shaking the device.


To make this project, you need:


  • A micro:bit



  • A battery pack with 2 AAA batteries



  • A USB cable (optional)



To code this project, you can use MakeCode or Python. Here are the steps:


  • Create a list of messages that you want to display on your name badge, such as "Hello", "I'm Bob", "Nice to meet you", etc.



  • Create a variable that stores the index of the current message in the list.



  • Create a loop that repeats forever.



  • Inside the loop, display the current message on the LED display using the scroll function.



  • Increase the index by one using the increment operator.



  • If the index is equal to or greater than the length of the list, set it back to zero using the assignment operator.



  • Add an event handler that runs when button A is pressed.



the index by one using the decrement operator.


  • Add an event handler that runs when button B is pressed.



  • Inside the event handler, increase the index by one using the increment operator.



  • Add an event handler that runs when the device is shaken.



  • Inside the event handler, set the index to a random number between zero and the length of the list minus one using the random function.



You can find the complete code for this project in MakeCode and Python on the official website of the BBC Micro:bit at https://microbit.org/projects/make-it-code-it/name-badge/.


Thermometer




You can turn your micro:bit into a simple thermometer that displays the temperature on the LED display. You can also change the display mode by pressing the buttons or shaking the device.


To make this project, you need:


  • A micro:bit



  • A battery pack with 2 AAA batteries



  • A USB cable (optional)



To code this project, you can use MakeCode or Python. Here are the steps:


  • Create a variable that stores the temperature in degrees Celsius using the temperature function.



  • Create a loop that repeats forever.



  • Inside the loop, display the temperature on the LED display using the show number function.



  • Add an event handler that runs when button A is pressed.



  • Inside the event handler, convert the temperature from degrees Celsius to degrees Fahrenheit using the formula: F = C * 9 / 5 + 32.



  • Add an event handler that runs when button B is pressed.



  • Inside the event handler, convert the temperature from degrees Fahrenheit to degrees Celsius using the formula: C = (F - 32) * 5 / 9.



  • Add an event handler that runs when the device is shaken.



  • Inside the event handler, display a happy face on the LED display if the temperature is between 18 and 25 degrees Celsius, or a sad face otherwise using the show icon function.



You can find the complete code for this project in MakeCode and Python on the official website of the BBC Micro:bit at https://microbit.org/projects/make-it-code-it/thermometer/.


How to get help and support for your BBC Micro:bit?




If you need help and support for your BBC Micro:bit, you have many options to choose from. You can use the official website and other online resources to find answers to your questions, learn new skills, and join a community of users and makers. Here are some of them:


The official website of the BBC Micro:bit




The official website of the BBC Micro:bit at https://microbit.org/ is your best source of information and guidance for your micro:bit. You can find everything you need to get started, code, make, teach, and learn with your micro:bit. You can also find news, events, stories, and inspiration from other users and makers around the world. You can also contact the Micro:bit Educational Foundation if you have any feedback or suggestions for improving your experience with your micro:bit.


The official user guide books in pdf format




the new micro:bit with speaker and microphone. You can choose between English and Spanish languages for the user guide book. The user guide book covers everything from setting up your micro:bit to coding and making projects with it. It also includes tips, tricks, and troubleshooting advice to help you get the most out of your micro:bit.


The official website of the Micro:bit Educational Foundation




The official website of the Micro:bit Educational Foundation at https://microbit.org/about/ is your best source of information and guidance for your micro:bit. You can find everything you need to get started, code, make, teach, and learn with your micro:bit. You can also find news, events, stories, and inspiration from other users and makers around the world. You can also contact the Micro:bit Educational Foundation if you have any feedback or suggestions for improving your experience with your micro:bit.


The Micro:bit Educational Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation that aims to inspire every child to create their best digital future. They do this by developing hardware and software that excites and appeals to a broad range of young people, creating free, user-friendly educational resources to support teachers in delivering engaging and creative lessons, and working with like-minded partners to deliver high-impact educational programmes across the globe.


Other online resources




Besides the official website and user guide books, there are many other online resources that you can use to help and support your micro:bit journey. Some of them are:


MakeCode: The official website of the MakeCode editor at https://makecode.microbit.org/


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